The Coronavirus-CX connection you knew was coming

Predictions from the CX director at Dentsu Isobar. Plus, Zendesk's CCO speaks, insights from Knowledge@Wharton and more

This is a weekly roundup of CX stories I’ve discovered around the Web. News and research stories are free to all. For in-depth stories on how companies apply CX data and strategies, become a subscriber.

As major industry conferences such as SxSW and Collision are cancelled or postponed due to the Coronavirus, virtual event application companies won’t be the only ones whose customer experience capabilities will be put to the test.

Writing on The Drum, Dentu Isobar‘s CX director predicts an increased interest in on-demand services such as UberEats, as well as chatbots and video tools that can help maintain a human-like connection to combat loneliness. Somewhat depressing but probably accurate.

More data to make the business case for a dedicated CX leader: an analyst from Nemertes Research teased high-level findings of its CX study of 517 firms on No Jitter, focusing on those who were most successful. More than half, or 59.2% of the success group have a chief customer officer (CCO), and within that group, 55.9% have documented an improvement in customer ratings.

Experiences shouldn’t just be managed, they should be “orchestrated,” according to Usermind’s Michel Feaster on CustomerThink. She offers some interesting thoughts on metrics, such as “journey throughput” and shifting from departmental goals to ones that can benefit multiple areas of the business and encourage collaboration.

Although it sounds like common sense, it was interesting to hear the relationship between those who use customer service team and the rate of customer retention/contract renewal. This was just one of the highlights of an interview with the CCO of Zendesk on Diginomica.

And finally, the Wharton School of Business has published an article that compares the current state of CX to sea changes like the introduction of mobile phones and cloud computing. “We can all look forward to decades of innovation,” the author writes. Let’s hope, 20 years from now, we’ll look back just as fondly.

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